00-02 AMERICAN BRILLIANT CUT GLASS EDUCATIONAL DVDs – OVER 3.000 SOLD

 

WHAT WE ARE SAYING IS…. IF YOU CAN TALK KNOWLEDGEABLY ABOUT THESE 65 CUT GLASS TOPICS THEN SAVE YOUR MONEY.  BUT IF YOU FEEL YOU MAY BE SPENDING A LOT OF MONEY ON A PRODUCT YOU SHOULD KNOW MORE ABOUT THEN THESE ARE FOR YOU1. Signatures, importance and unimportance
2. How C.G. was cut – a study using demonstration piece
3. Assembly line cutting vs. European style
4. Reproduction glass – in old B.P. patterns – what is actual value today?
5. Care and cleaning of your cut glass
6. History of Dorflinger Glass, highlights of
7. Details of what cutters physically went through cutting blanks
8. Artistry of intaglio vs. craftsmanship of geometric cutting
9. Optimum pattern for optical and engineering effect
10. Apprenticeship process and procedures – step by step
11. How OSHA and child labor laws would have changed the B.P.
12. How B.P. cutting processes differ from Waterford cutting procedures
13. Which pattern is named after and reflects a specific location?
14. Which three patterns and motifs require the wheel to cut three surfaces simultaneously?
15. What is the most utilitarian item of cut glass?
16. Why wood-polished pieces have a softer feel
17. Acid polish – how it was done and the dangers to the workers
18. The importance of a thorough receipt – or how to guarantee you got what you paid for
19. Why stoppers are not interchangeable
20. Why patterns must match on items with two or more parts
21. How to check handles for cracks and annealing marks
22. What was the status gift of the B.P.?
23. Confusion and accuracy in patterns
24. Study of the Russian pattern, highlights of
25. Did factory workers work a 5-day week or a 6-day week – a humorous look back
26. Factory job changes during the hot summer months
27. How to occasionally spot a piece cut during the summer by a displaced blower
28. Blown blanks and how they did them
29. Assets and liabilities of blown blanks
30. How to tell instantly the difference between the figured and blown blank
31. Figured blanks and how they did them
32. Assets and liabilities of figured blanks
33. Wood polish and how they did it
34. Assets and liabilities of wood polish
35. How to tell the difference between wood polish and acid polish                                                     36. Acid polish and how it was done
37. Assets and liabilities of acid polish
38. What actually ended the B.P.
39. The effect of three major tariffs on the growth and survival of the B.P.
40. How a Democratic President and a Democratic Congress did more harm to the B.P. than WW1
41. The removal of stains from bottles
42. The several causes of stains and how to treat each
43. What to do with a clean break on a family heirloom – just don’t throw it away
44. What extra step do show dealers do to make their C.G. sparkle that you can do at home
45. Collecting objects or patterns
46. The importance of building a “well-balanced” collection
47. Intrinsic values; in collecting does it really matter?
48. What does “mint” mean?
49. Restoration – when it is called for and how it affects the values
50. Excerpts from an interview with an old cutter and some “tricks of the trade” not in any book
51. Interaction between the Parshe Glass Co. and Pitkins & Brooks Co. of Chicago during the B.P.
52. B.P. items that were rarely manufactured in this country and were almost always imported, and the reason why
53. The little details that separate the elite C.G. companies from all the rest
54. Why are blown blanks often heavier than you would expect and why are figured blanks often lighter in weight than you would expect?
55. How to recognize the recent imported cut glass
56. History of colored cut-to-clear
57. Production problems with colored cut-to-clear
58. Dorflinger’s role in colored cut-to-clear
59. Telling American cut-to-clear from European Co.
60. Collecting colored cut-to-clear today
61. Insurance Coverage
62. Long term glass storage
63. Earthquake protection that works
64. Photography without shadows
65. Appraisals, when one is needed

HOW DID YOU DO ON THE QUIZ ABOVE?   COULD YOU EXPLAIN THESE TOPICS TO A NEW COLLECTOR?  IF YOU CAN — THEN YOU DON’T  NEED THESE DVDs…………………OTHERWISE,  HOW CONFIDENT ARE YOU IN THE SAFETY OF YOUR INVESTMENT DOLLARS AND HOW SURE ARE YOU THAT YOU GOT WHAT YOU THINK YOU PAID FOR?
NOW REALLY…………………..doesn’t it make sense if you are going to invest your hard earned money in this great American product you would be well-served to learn all you can about it? – WELL …this four volume set gives you over 7 hours of information on American Brilliant Period Cut Glass, circa 1875 to 1915. We have sold over 2800 of these tapes on a VHS format, and are now offering them on a DVD format. We have added some additional information that was not on the videos and brought them ‘up to date’ so to speak.

This educational series was developed in the early 90s by Sharon and Dean DeOgny, specialist in American Cut Glass for over 38 years doing business as Sentimental Journey Antiques. At least ninety-five percent of the information does not appear in any CG book, but is based upon hours spent with the old cutters and workers in the early 1970s. This set is in most major museums and required viewing in many.   We have been members of the American Cut Glass Assn. since day one and subscribe to their code of ethics. You may use ‘ask seller a question’ for a complimentary brochure on our Cut Glass Video Club (now on DVD) or ask any questions. The Video Club is now in its 17th year. It is a FREE program and number 79 was mailed to the members last week (late June). You may email us at deogny@sentimentaljourney.net. to sign on or ask any questions 

                                                                             NOW….The contents of the four DVDs are:

                                                                    VOLUME I :    The Brilliant Period Years – 1875 to 1915

This 1:45 Min. DVD is an appropriate introduction to this study of american cut glass. Our study looks at the outside forces that affected those that made the glass. We look at the daily turmoils and travails of the workers; their dreams and aspirations, along with the daily grind and boredom. The owners faced larger problems; huge sums invested in a luxury commodity, manufactured during a fickle economy resembling a yo-yo; five tariff changes; a recession or depression in every decade; a dependant work force and always a continual payroll to meet. To make it more interesting, we tie in a little backgrounds of the cut glass companies’ interaction with one another. We learn that industrial espionage is not new to our generation. For example, you will learn how H.P. Sinclaire, while the highest paid employee at Hawkes, met surreptitiously with Dorflinger at a neutral site for the express purpose of sabotaging Hawkes’ plans for his company’s future. We will evaluate his grievance against Hawkes to see if this drastic action was justified. HERE IS A BONUS:….We tie the whole 40 year brilliant period together with a two-sided matrix hand-out. You can follow the information on the TV screen, plus use the matrix as a handy reference without replaying the entire video. The hand-out covers politics, congressional control, populations, tariffs, economics, inventions, music, sports, cut glass, patterns, and the key events each year that impacted on this fragile industry. If you love american brilliant period cut glass – an understanding of how the workers and owners lived their lives will make your appreciation even greater.
                                                                       VOLUME II:   “How did they do that?”
Ever wonder why 95% of the collectors are men? Women say, “Isn’t it beautiful?” and many say, “I agree with you it is beautiful, but how did they do that?” Men admire precision, the craftsmanship, the discipline, the patience, the stress, the tension and both the strength and finesse needed to cut this wondrous glass. It is no wonder men say, “How did the do that?” This two hour DVD will give both men and women all the information needed to answer that question. Among the subjects covered: The glass formula, the ovens and furnace layout, two forms of blown glass, the duties of each of the four-man blowing team, the extra work some pieces get coming from the annealing room, the duties of each of the three-man cutting team, the evolution that increased production 10-fold overnight, how the glass is actually cut using a demonstration piece, assembly line cutting vs. the european style, details of what cutters physically went through during the cutting process, why wood polished pieces have a softer feel and look, how to occasionally spot a piece cut during the summer months by a displaced glass blower, blown blanks and how the did them, how to tell instantly the difference between a blown blank and a figured blank, assets and liabilities of figured blanks and assets and liabilities of acid polish, acid polish and how it was done, history of colored cut-to-clear, production and cutting problems that shortened the “color” era, Dorflinger’s role in colored cut-to-clear and a great deal more.
                                                                            VOLUME III:   “The Buying Game”

This DVD teaches you to buy, or not to buy, like the dealers do. You will learn to evaluate a piece of glass as to quality of blank, polish and desirability. We will take you step by step through the process of making a buying decision. We share the dealers’ thought process from the first glimpse, at some distance away, up to and through the actual touching of the intriguing piece. Learn the questions to ask the parties involved. But most importantly, learn the questions to ask yourself each step along the way. Successful dealers will buy about one piece for every 100 they examine. You will learn the reasons the 99 are not purchased. A cut glass dealer can evaluate all the factors involved, albeit in fractions of seconds, and you will learn all the techniques to make the same evaluations. Among the subjects covered: signatures, importance and unimportance, the optimum patterns for optical and engineering effect, acid polish – how to detect it and the assets and liabilities of this style of polish, why stoppers are not interchangeable, how to check handles for cracks and annealing marks, blown blanks and figured blanks, the assets and liabilities of each and how to tell in an instant which you have before you and which you want in your collection, you will learn how wood polish was done and the assets and liabilities of this style polish, and why you want both wood and acid polished in your collection, and determining to collect objects or patterns or both. Watch this 75 minutes tape a couple of times and you will know more about evaluating cut glass than 95% of the shop and show dealers….and that’s not all bad folks.
                                                                         VOLUME IV:   “Preserving Your Investment”

This DVD has been referred to as “The most important” of the 4-part series. Even if you are not interested in the history of the period (Vol. 1), if you don’t care how they made it (Vol. 2), and you are not concerned about how to buy it (Vol. 3) let us assume you own some glass that needs preservation and protection. You will learn about appraisals (not always called for), restoration (not always called for), insurance (not always called for), and proper care and cleaning (always called for). As regards care and cleaning, you will learn cut glass had only two enemies and how to avoid each. Along the way you will learn how dealers keep their glass so bright and the strange, but true, reason that dust doesn’t cling to old glass. Dorothy Daniels tells in her 1950 book about stresses in glass from improper annealing procedures. You will learn which pieces are most likely to contain stresses and to shatter during restoration. There is a device for detecting stresses and why, prior to restoration work on a very rare and valuable piece, it is advised to have this test done. This, like most of the information we are presenting has never appeared in any publication. SPECIAL NOTE: During the 1980s cut glass was made in the rarest of patterns to fool collectors and it was quite well done. Some is appearing again as hundreds of pieces ended up in collections. There are five tests to determine the new from the old and we go over each. Incidentally, the black light test, you see mentioned on eBay, is the least effective of all the tests. Among other subjects covered: getting stains out of bottles and vases, how to know when restoration is called for, when insurance coverage is called for, and an appraisal is called for, how to photograph your glass without any shadows, how to guard against earthquake damage if you are in a susceptible area and how long-term storage can damage your glass if it is wrapped in the wrong materials. Very little of the information on this DVD is available anywhere else to help you preserve your investment.

I WILL ASK ONE MORE TIME JUST TO BE SURE……………HOW DID YOU DO ON THE QUIZ ABOVE?   COULD YOU EXPLAIN THESE TOPICS TO A NEW COLLECTOR?  ………………..OTHERWISE,  HOW CONFIDENT ARE YOU IN YOUR OVERALL KNOWLEDGE, THE SAFETY OF YOUR INVESTMENT DOLLARS AND HOW SURE ARE YOU THAT YOU GOT WHAT YOU THINK YOU PAID FOR?   THINK ABOUT IT. 

Price is $59.95 with free shipping.

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Published in: on 12/19/2009 at 12:35 pm  Comments (1)